Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from December, 2017

Dust Bunnies and sensor dirt on full frame DSLR cameras

Here's an image which, although not particularly interesting is one I wanted to work on.

I needed to use a small aperture of f22 for this shot to slow everything down as I didn't have a neutral density filter, and that's where the trouble starts because a  small aperture shows all the dust bunnies.

At a glance, there's only a couple of dust spots visible, but once I look at the top half of it in Lightroom.

Every one of those stands out like a sore thumb at 100% and not only does it fail my own QC, it would fail Alamy QC, and get me a short uploading ban.

This is what it looks like as I remove, or clone out the spots.


Then, a little more work and I have the finished image.



It's not a keeper for me, unfortunately, as it is, as I said earlier, a bit boring, but it's all good practice.
Dust bunnies will always be a problem with DSLR mirrored and even mirrorless cameras even with the utmost hygiene practices and care whilst changing lenses, and, for me, it's wh…

Here we go again with blatant Image theft.

Believe me, I don't sit around all day waiting for people to take my pictures and use them for their own profit, but, it still astounds me that journalists simply don't seem to think there will be any penalty if they help themselves to an image off the internet, with not the slightest attempt to qualify the ownership of the intellectual property.

Most of my photographic output goes directly to stock, but some of it is shared on social media, by choice but with no licence for use by anyone else.

The ones shared on social media are usually on facebook on closed groups, and despite what people thinking and saying that Facebook can do whatever they want with your images it is simply not true.

I retain copyright and do not allow licensing of my images when I share them on Facebook, so, if you take them for a commercial venture you are infringing my copyright and stealing my property.

Now, if you were to just share them to a local history group on facebook I might not be bothered as…

Making a time-lapse with LR 5

It's blustery weather where we are, so I've been having a little timelapse fun to pass the time.

This video was saved at 1080 but would have been faster loading at 720.


The Camera was set up on a tripod with manual settings, except for auto ISO, all the frames were shot in RAW using a plugin intervalometer set to one frame every 10 seconds up to a total of 300 frames which takes about half an hour.

They were then imported into Lightroom where a few adjustments on one frame are made such as cropping to 16:9 and then copied to the rest using auto-sync.
Further settings are decided in the Slideshow module, then the whole 300 are exported at 24fps to give me a 10 second MP4 movie.



I could have also used the built-in intervalometer which is included as part of the Magic Lantern software which I also use on my Canon 6d.