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Police and photographers during the Corona Virus Pandemic.

Will you get banged up for being out and about? The Covid pandemic is changing a lot of peoples lives, not least editorial photographers. Leaving home is allowed for work if you can't work from home, which, in the case of editorial photographers means we are allowed to travel to shoot pictures which we hope will be used by the media to accompany news stories, or even to generate news stories, but we also go out to shoot stock pictures, which are often a bigger part of the way we earn a living. According to posters on various photography forums, it seems that this isn't so straightforward, with some photographers meeting aggressive police intimidation or enforcement of 'Covid Rules', including being prevented from shooting pictures or being removed from public places when they are trying to go about their lawful business. Even when showing a press card there are reports of photographers being prevented from working, but, most photographers who I know don't even own a

Staying legal with photos posted on your own internet posts.

You've written a fantastic post about your visit to France and just need a couple of pictures to help pad it out and be more interesting, after all, 'a picture is worth a thousand words', so do you just grab one from a Google search? This 800 pixel image of Chateau Chenonceau is big enough for social media and blog posts and is only 176kb so it loads fast for your viewers. Yes you can... but be prepared for the owner to come after you for infringing their copyright after they find it being used without permission on your internet platforms. The best way to obtain pictures to use within your own web content, be that on Facebook, Blogs or any other internet platform (within reason), is to buy a licence which will cover you for the use. I allow my own images to be downloaded for such uses in two sizes on my website here...  mickflynnimages . They are all provided instantly, do not contain a watermark and are ideal to illustrate your stories and articles. News

Timelapse of the MSC Kwangyang

Timelapse of the MSC Kwangyang MSC Kwangyang? Yes, it just happened to pass by on the horizon line at the end as I was shooting another timelapse, this time with my Canon 6d DSLR. I was hoping that the clouds would change into a storm front and become more dramatic, so I chose that particular view with Peacock Island near the horizon line, and, nothing much happened! For this timelapse, I took 940 images in RAW with 5 seconds between each one using a 75-300 EF lens and the Magic Lantern Intervalometer which is loaded on startup from the SD card. It was mid-afternoon so there isn't a problem with big changes in exposure, allowing me to use ISO 100 for quality with an f-stop of 6.3 which is about the sweet spot for this particular lens, and a fast shutter of 1000th of a second as it was on a tall tripod at full zoom in a breeze. These RAW files are imported into Lightroom with my user preset which has a couple of small tweaks to correct the very bad CA and fringing I g

Getting your settings right with the Sony RX100M3 and an iPhone 5s

On a recent excursion to the Skywalk at Santa Pola, Alicante Province, Spain to shoot some pictures for stock I only used the Sony RX100M3. I'm familiar with the camera and popped off a few shots to upload to my stock portfolio on ALAMY . It was mid-morning and the light is pretty poor, particularly looking out to sea, so the best shots were to be had in the opposite direction. The best way to achieve better results was to put the RX100 onto a monopod and use the wifi remote control feature to take some shots from high up to give a better scale to the view, and also to avoid the harsh light a little. When I used my other Sony camera, the RX10 in conjunction with the Sony Playmemories 'smart remote control' software I didn't have any problems getting the results I wanted, but the setup with the RX100, for me, is not very intuitive. Anyway, I set it up, and after hoisting it aloft I took a few pics using my phone as a remote control which I was fairly happy with.

Dust Bunnies and sensor dirt on full frame DSLR cameras

Here's an image which, although not particularly interesting is one I wanted to work on. I needed to use a small aperture of f22 for this shot to slow everything down as I didn't have a neutral density filter, and that's where the trouble starts because a  small aperture shows all the dust bunnies. At a glance, there's only a couple of dust spots visible, but once I look at the top half of it in Lightroom. Every one of those stands out like a sore thumb at 100% and not only does it fail my own QC, it would fail Alamy QC, and get me a short uploading ban. This is what it looks like as I remove, or clone out the spots. Then, a little more work and I have the finished image. It's not a keeper for me, unfortunately, as it is, as I said earlier, a bit boring, but it's all good practice. Dust bunnies will always be a problem with DSLR mirrored and even mirrorless cameras even with the utmost hygiene practices and care whilst changing lenses, a

Here we go again with blatant Image theft.

Believe me, I don't sit around all day waiting for people to take my pictures and use them for their own profit, but, it still astounds me that journalists simply don't seem to think there will be any penalty if they help themselves to an image off the internet, with not the slightest attempt to qualify the ownership of the intellectual property. Most of my photographic output goes directly to stock, but some of it is shared on social media, by choice but with no licence for use by anyone else. The ones shared on social media are usually on facebook on closed groups, and despite what people thinking and saying that Facebook can do whatever they want with your images it is simply not true. I retain copyright and do not allow licensing of my images when I share them on Facebook, so, if you take them for a commercial venture you are infringing my copyright and stealing my property. Now, if you were to just share them to a local history group on facebook I might not be both

Making a time-lapse with LR 5

It's blustery weather where we are, so I've been having a little timelapse fun to pass the time. This video was saved at 1080 but would have been faster loading at 720. The Camera was set up on a tripod with manual settings, except for auto ISO, all the frames were shot in RAW using a plugin intervalometer set to one frame every 10 seconds up to a total of 300 frames which takes about half an hour. They were then imported into Lightroom where a few adjustments on one frame are made such as cropping to 16:9 and then copied to the rest using auto-sync. Further settings are decided in the Slideshow module, then the whole 300 are exported at 24fps to give me a 10 second MP4 movie. I could have also used the built-in intervalometer which is included as part of the Magic Lantern software which I also use on my Canon 6d.